CT Interior Design - Release: 6-30-2009

Federal Judge Declares Connecticut Interior Design Law Unconstitutional


WEB RELEASE: June 30, 2009
Media Contact:
Bob Ewing (703) 682-9320

[Economic Liberty] 


New Haven, Conn.—A federal judge today struck down a state law that unconstitutionally censored the free speech of interior designers in Connecticut. 

In a thorough, clearly worded 23-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Mark Kravitz systematically considered and rejected each of the state's arguments in support of the challenged law, a so-called "title act" for interior designers.  Title acts are laws that regulate only the speech, but not the work associated with a given occupation.  Thus, in Connecticut-as in 46 other states around the country including New York, Massachusetts, and California-anyone may work as an interior with no license or other special government oversight of any kind.  But since 1983, Connecticut law has prohibited anyone not registered as an interior designer with the Department of Consumer Protection from referring to himself as an "interior designer," even when that term accurately describes what he does.

Interior design laws are the product of a decades-long lobbying effort by an elitist group of industry insiders seeking to limit competition by driving other interior designers out of work.  That effort, led by the American Society of Interior Designers, is documented in an Institute for Justice study entitled "Designing Cartels."  Another study from IJ called "Designed to Exclude," released in February 2009, shows that interior design regulations like Connecticut's not only increase costs for consumers but also disproportionately exclude minorities and older career-switchers from the interior design industry.  Both studies are available online: www.ij.org/interiordesign.
 
"Shortly after I began practicing interior design twenty-five years ago, a woman from the Department of Consumer Protection showed up at my business and ordered me to stop calling myself an interior designer," said Susan Roberts, one of the three plaintiffs who successfully challenged Connecticut's interior design law.  "That is an outrageous act of censorship on the part of the state, and I am thrilled that I can now tell the world that I am what I have always been since I started doing this work-an interior designer."

As Judge Kravitz explained in rejecting the state's legal arguments, "the term 'interior designer' is not a term of art and it is not inherently misleading."  Moreover, "[i]f the State were seeking to convey the existence of a regulatory regime in this field, then a term such as 'licensed interior designer,' or 'registered interior designer,' would far better serve that interest."

"When it was enacted in 1983, Connecticut's interior design law represented the cutting edge of a concerted effort to cartelize the interior design industry for the benefit of ASID and its members," said Clark Neily the Institute for Justice senior attorney who led the successful court challenge.  "Along with several grassroots and industry groups, we have brought that campaign to a halt and are systematically dismantling the barriers it has erected to fair competition in the interior design field.  We are confident that when the dust settles, consumers in every state will be able to choose the designer whom they think best suits their needs, and interior designers themselves will be free to go as far as their ambition, talent, and dreams will take them."

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