• October 11, 2016    |   Other

    Real activism.  Real results. The Institute for Justice, the national law firm for liberty, is seeking candidates for its highly selective Maffucci Fellowship program.  Fellows work closely with IJ’s activism and coalitions team, which fights to change the world at the grassroots through outreach, community organizing, training, coalition building, and public demonstrations—a unique brand of…

  • June 10, 2016    |   Economic Liberty

    In Florida, the law requires 2,190 days of training to become an interior designer and a government license. It takes just 34 days to become an emergency medical technician. Something is wrong with this picture. And one Florida high schooler has a solution. The problem is occupational licensing run amok. Occupational licenses are just what…

  • February 10, 2016

    Last month, the Institute for Justice and local property-owners-turned-activists struck a decisive victory for property rights in Mt. Airy, North Carolina. This fight provides a perfect example of how threatened property owners can employ grassroots activism to quickly defeat redevelopment projects. Here’s the blow-by-blow: In the center of Mt. Airy lies an abandoned factory known…

  • February 3, 2016    |   School Choice

    IJ is committed to defending the right of parents—not politicians, not bureaucrats—to choose the education that best fits their child’s needs. When needed, we defend this right in court, and we’ve been doing so for 25 years. We also support a parent’s right to choose outside of the courtroom, from legislative chambers, to the halls…

  • January 22, 2016    |   Private Property

    In far too many states, civil forfeiture enables law enforcement to take ownership of property without even charging its owner with a crime.   And some states make challenging forfeiture cost-prohibitive—so innocent owners can never even get their day in court. Michigan and Illinois require property owners to post a bond equal to 10 percent of the value…

  • December 14, 2015    |   Private Property

    The overwhelming majority of states, the District of Columbia, and the federal government allow law enforcement to use civil forfeiture to seize and keep your property without even charging you with a crime, much less convicting you. Worse yet, the very government officials who take your car, home, or cash often get to keep it…

  • December 2, 2015    |   Economic Liberty

    Food carts—selling hot dogs, tamales, and other delicious foods—are a staple of urban life. Yet until recently, Chicago banned the sale of any sort of prepared food from carts in the city. Street vendors, who are most often immigrants on the first rung of the economic ladder and willing to work long hours in search…

  • November 20, 2015    |   Economic Liberty

    This week, San Diego won a major victory in its bid to deregulate taxicabs. A California superior court judge ruled against a group of taxi companies seeking to prevent the city from issuing any new taxi permits. IJ intervened in the case to represent two taxi drivers who simply wanted to work for themselves. In…

  • November 20, 2015    |   Economic Liberty

    Sidewalk vending gives aspiring and hard-working entrepreneurs a chance to provide for their families and pursue the American dream. But Los Angeles bans the practice, turning tens of thousands of Angelenos into criminals. With its low capital and training requirements, sidewalk vending can be a chance to earn a living for people with few other…

  • November 4, 2015    |   Private Property

    As Oklahomans debate civil forfeiture reforms, there have been calls for more facts and fewer hypotheticals. The debate is welcome news as civil forfeiture is one of the biggest threats to property rights in Oklahoma and across the United States today. Civil forfeiture is a law enforcement tactic that allows police and prosecutors to seize…

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